My Body, My Self 

'Staying awake at the plate' is about eating mindfully, more fully aware of your emotions, your behaviors, and your motivations around eating.  It’s about living in the present moment with your eating behavior rather than worrying about the past or obsessing about the future.  
Every idea we’re exploring in MyBodyMySelf centers around becoming aware of your eating behavior and figuring out what works and doesn’t work for you. Mindful eating is what Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habits, defines as a keystone habit – a certain habit that’s actually more important than other habits because it transforms everything around it. Today's discussion explores the large and small ways mindfulness can transform your eating. 

We have quite a bit to consider when piecing apart our individual relationship with food and our bodies.  But before we get to working with the individual pieces, we need to re-align our ultimate destination. This is a version of re-calibrating our internal GPS around our body image and eating. Where are we headed?  

The first stop will be intentionally replacing the 30 year old picture of Twiggy or Farrah or whoever you have gnawing in the back of your mind as your model of what you think you should look like. For our generation that came of age in the early days of the feminist movement, the image/role model could likely be you, yourself at a younger time and weight. Or for those of us stuck in food prison, it is most likely a relentless adherence to Twiggy-like a number on the scale. Or it could be her clothing size, that keeps you captive, forbidding you from ever enjoying a piece of bread or dessert. 

I just spent the last two weeks in Paris eating French food, drinking French wine, and talking about life with French women. It just doesn’t get much better than that for me!

With all the discussion about body image and 'diet culture' in the United States, I was fascinated to learn that the average French woman doesn’t have the same issues around her body image and eating that we have here in America. While French society does put pressure on women to be thin, your average (not eating disordered) French woman does not diet and is not struggling with the emotional consequences of food restricting that so many American women experience. How could this be?

Emotions and eating go together like peas and carrots, especially in our culture over the last 60 or so years. A woman’s own relationship with her body, eating, and her emotional life can be very complicated.  This relationship is unique to each woman; we each have our own pieces of the emotional-food-use puzzle discussed in this section.  A women who struggles with too much mindshare spent on food, eating, and her body may be only slightly aware of what is going on in her mind.  Much of the emotional involvement is going on below the surface. My hope is that you can see yourself in some of the following discussion of food and mood, so you can become aware when your own emotions are engaged around eating and food.  Once aware of what you are feeling, you have the option to choose another way to be around food, rather than have eating and food mixed up with coping with or avoiding your emotional life. 

Why is a chocolate chip cookie so irresistible?  Does it have some magic spell that glazes over your eyes and has you forget that eating too many of them can make your pants tighter? Well, actually, yes it does.  

For most of us having trouble resisting a cookie at certain times, we’re using the cookie – substitute your own food here -- for another purpose. We are trying re-gain some sort of emotional balance. Just as your body will heal a cut, so will your body seek mental balance to preserve a steady emotional state.  The pleasure from tasting something delicious works as a temporary balm from emotional stress.  Neuroscientists have shown that the pleasure centers of your brain light up from a chocolate chip cookie in a similar pattern to how your brain would light up on drugs.