My Body, Myself 

compassion

With so much emphasis on how women's bodies appear to others in our Kardashian Culture it seems almost impossible maintain body confidence. The following four blogs discuss how to develop a positive body image in our crazy world.

The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA’s) defines positive body image:

  • A clear, true perception of your shape--you see the various parts of your body as they really are.
  • You appreciate your natural body shape and you understand that a person’s physical appearance says very little about their character and value as a person.
  • You accept your unique body and refuse to spend an unreasonable amount of time worrying about food, weight, and calories.
  • You feel comfortable and confident in your body.

I’d like to re-set our eating intentions to a different time when women didn’t have eating and body image problems like today. I want to take you back 100 years to our grandmother’s younger days. Let’s consider your young grandmother’s relationship to food and her body and what it could teach us. Let’s make eating just eating again. I’d like to ratchet down the emotional investment and the stakes for each piece of food we put in our mouths. No obsession. No emotional attachment to a number on the scale. Let’s think about eating for nourishment and for pleasure like people did forever before our day and age.

We all know physical appearance is just a part of who you are.  Clearly too much emphasis has been placed on appearance in Kardashian Culture. So, if appearance says little about your value as a person, what does say something about your character and value as a person to you?  How do you define yourself?  Is it in terms of being a loving mom?  A kind friend?  Capable at your job? It's probably a combination of these things that make up your whole you.  

Many women spend the healthy years we have being alive distracted from living because we feel shame about our bodies. Many women engage in a tremendous amount of self-judgment and self-punishment around food and weight. Time spent being disappointed in yourself can be a remarkable time-sink in a person’s life.  Research shows that the average women spends 31 years of her life dieting. How much time have you spent in past decades telling yourself that your body was flawed?