My Body, My Self 

emotions & eating

Fifty percent of adult women and 90% of teenage girls went on a diet in 2017 according to the Livestrong website. In our crazy, body-obsessed diet culture, these dieters hope to control the size and shape of their bodies by controlling their food intake. 

Dieting isn’t just officially becoming a Weight Watchers member like Oprah. Dieting is the deliberate restriction of food with the intention of losing weight or re-shaping the body. Many people swear they are not on a diet, but live locked into a very specific allowance of calories, points, or carbs in order to have their body look different.

My Body, Myself addresses mindshare --the time in your life and space in your mind taken up with your body’s appearance and your eating behavior.  We all live somewhere on the mindshare continuum.

You could be obsessed with staying thin; people suffering from anorexia have 100% mindshare on food.  Or you could be preoccupied with going on diets -- restricting your food to lose weight -- with potentially between 25%-75% of your mindshare devoted to what you eat.  Or you could spend your day noticing how your body appears to others: checking yourself on your scale, mirror, fitbit, and in selfies -- just making sure you are "okay." Or you could have a tape-recording playing in the background of your mind, telling you something horrible about your body's appearance at points throughout the day. 

Many women spend the healthy years we have being alive distracted from living because we feel shame about our bodies. Many women engage in a tremendous amount of self-judgment and self-punishment around food and weight. Even Oprah, one of the most successful women on the planet, probably goes to bed feeling guilty because of what she ate that day. Time spent being disappointed in yourself can be a remarkable time-sink in a person’s life.  Research shows that the average women spends 31 years of her life dieting. How much time have you spent in past decades telling yourself that your body was flawed? Look at pictures of yourself from those olden days; do you now realize how wonderful you actually looked? From an objective vantage point, you can appreciate the smile on your younger face and look in your younger eyes, and not hone in on just how thin (or not) your legs looked.